Teen

Teens are a high risk population for violence and abuse because they are twice as likely as an adult to be a victim of a violent crime and they are exposed to more violence than any other segment of our population.

The Teen CAP program offers strategies to prevent this violence and is developmentally appropriate for students’ grades 7th through 12th. After the adult presentations, two CAP facilitators provide prevention programming in students’ classrooms on three sequential days for forty to forty-five minutes, an average class period. Workshops are held in individual classrooms. The program includes discussion of personal safety rights, types of assaults and effective strategies for handling many potentially dangerous situations.   Throughout the workshop series, common assault situations are presented via short scenarios and guided group discussions. Time is set aside after the workshops for students who wish to talk to facilitators about the workshop material or problems. This time is called “review time”.

Day One: The program discusses personal safety rights, common kinds of assault against adolescents, and strategies for handling dangerous situations. Domestic violence is introduced and conversation ensues regarding the cycle of violence. During the workshop, “self-protection” strategies are taught; including ways of walking assertively, the CAP yell and other self-defense movements.

Goals: 

  • Introduce CAP project
  • Define and give concrete examples of personal safety rights.
  • Explain and give relevant examples of how these rights are taken away in assault situations.
  • Introduce strategies for keeping personal safety rights.
  • Give teens a language to discuss the various types of assaults, including neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse, Introduce and review a battering scenario.
  • Discuss the cycle of violence.
  • Demonstrate the use of self-defense for thwarting stranger attacks.

Day Two: Sexual harassment is discussed with an emphasis on the difference between sexual harassment and flirting.  Sexting is discussed conversation ensues with the responsibility of the witnesses to respond in an assertive manner to help the victim be more apt to behave in a positive solution to the problem. Types of sexual assaults are defined and discussed.

Goals:

  • Remind and reinforce students’ personal safety rights.
  • Introduce and discuss scenario and strategies to deal with sexual harassment.
  • Introduce and discuss scenario and strategies to deal with sexting.
  • Give teens a language to discuss the various types of assaults, including sexual harassment, sexting, and sexual abuse including: pornography, Commercial Sexual Exploitation (Trafficking), voyeurism, exhibitionism, molestation, incest and rape.

Day Three: The program focuses on sexual assault by adults and peers. Through discussion of scenarios of an assault by a known adult and an assault by a peer in an acquaintance relationship, skills are taught to prevent sexual assault. Discussions of homophobia, social and sexual stereotypes and acquaintance rape result from these scenarios. During this workshop, we challenge some of the culturally supported beliefs regarding physical and sexual aggression.

Goals:

  • Discuss sexual assault involving a known offender.
  • Discuss sexual assault as victim and offender.
  • Review skills for recognizing and handling dangerous situations.
  • Examine dating myths.
  • Encourage young men/women to take responsibility in their dating relationships.

Time is set aside after the workshops for students who wish to talk to facilitators about the workshop material or to have further discussions. This time is called “review time”.

NJ CAP is located at the Educational Resource Center, and is a RTC of the International Center for Assault Prevention. It partners with state, national and worldwide prevention advocates.